Archivi tag: Design and Planet

How can #Design save the #Planet? The answer from #ydd2018 participants.

We asked the young and talented Youth Design Day in Japan participants how, in their opinion, Design can be part of the Planet’s safeguarding movement.

In the video below, you can find the answers they give us to the question “How can Design save the Planet?


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Upcycled televisions transformed into lamps: From Milan to Osaka through the theme of Design and Planet.

Christian Carlino is an Italian 33 years old designer who create some lamps starting from upcycled old televisions. Read the interview to discover where he finds his inspiration and other information about his project!

SOYC: “Christian, can you explain us what your project is about and how it can be considered sustainable?”

Christian: “Light and color, two fundamental states of our lives that govern and influence our existence. Each color influences in its own way what we are, how we live and the surrounding world. Starting from this reflection, I decided to give new life to some old and died iconic televisions to make them an integral part of our lives and to make sure that those interacting with them decide actively how the object should influence to us in a positive way. Each lamp is a unique object, the result of careful research of models and materials, with the aim of safeguarding a historical memory of the design of many models produced around the ’60s and’ 70s that at the time carried out their social function being also transportable objects. Everything is made in an artisan way and each model is linked to a record / artist that has marked the history of music from the 60s to 2001, the year of the first historical decay of the new millennium.”

SOYC: “How was born your idea?”

Christian: “The idea was born with the aim of finding a solution to reuse old televisions that I had collected at my vintage-style studio that remained unused; after a careful reflection on the use of furniture that the object itself covers today, I come to the conclusion that it is not acceptable that there are objects that after having undergone a careful design phase end up completing their life all ‘inside of landfills or thrown where it happens.”

SOYC: “And what did inspire you?”

Christian: What inspired me can be found in the power that the energy fields and the frequencies have on us as human beings. Every vibration, every color, every object, whatever is present on this planet influences our lives. I asked myself how I could find a way through which the interlocutor was no longer a passive subject, but became himself the actor of his own life, leaving to him every choice and every joy in choosing through colors which feeling or emotion he wanted to live in this moment. I combined all this in a historical-cultural research that put the individual in the center thanks to the light, the colors and our inner power and also laid the foundations for the diffusion of a culture of reuse towards the goal of ever greater respect towards nature for a more ethical and less wasteful future.


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Cardboard-made lounge chair: a 100% sustainable and recycled project from Milan to Osaka Youth Design Day

Alessandro Azzolini is a young Italian Architectural Design student at Politecnico di Milano. He designed a lounge chair which is completely made of recycled cardboards.

Here the interview we had with him!

SOYC: “Alessandro, can you talk about your project and its sustainability dimension?”

Alessandro: “My project consists of a lounge chair completely made of regenerated corrugated cardboard sheets that are laser-cut and assembled together with interlocking joints. Carboard is a very eco-sustainable material since it comes from renewable sources and can be recycled. The interlocking joints make the structure stable and allow to completely avoid the use of glue in a way to keep the 100% recyclabilityIt can be assembled in a quick way directly by the final user and it can be easily disassembled and stored flat in a way that occupies the least amount of space.”

SOYC: Why did you decide to design your chair?”

Alessandro: Because it is very economical since it uses waste material that can be obtained for free and because overall the chair has a very low environmental impact.
The choice of material and the easiness of (dis)assembly make this product perfect as a temporary furniture. When the chair’s lifecycle has ended, either because it has been damaged or the user wants to change it (since the contemporary world is very fast in consumption), the cardboard can just be thrown into the paper trash bin without problems and without worrying about the impact on our planet resources (since the reused cardboard of the chair would in any case have headed to the paper waste).”

SOYC: What did inspire your design concept?

Alessandro: “The design takes inspiration on one side from the shape of those ergonomic plastic seating that are meant to maximise comfort and on the other side from the metal grid-structure chairs, which I was sceptical about but after testing them in my life I realised they were comfortable indeed. The seating shape is lofted to form a circle, that in the base forms an elliptical footprint.
The chair components can be made out of 16 sheets of cardboard measuring 1x2m or either from 34 sheets of 1×1,2m. The dimension of sheets used is flexible and the number of sheets depends on it.”


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Akabei: a sustainable metal-made stool for The Youth Design Day in Japan

Emanuele Matteucci, Giovanni Silvestri and Michele Tunzi are three Design of the Industrial Product students in Bologna, Italy. They created Akabei, a metal stool starting from one single scrap of metal found as a reject in a mechanical workshop. This is where the sustainability of their project stands. Here the short interview we had with them!

SOYC: “Can you talk us about your design project and its sustainability?”

Students: “Our stool, Akabei, is truly sustainable for many aspects. It is made from a single rectangular sheet of inox steel of only 2 millimetres in thickness. We need only two machineries to produce it: one for cutting the sheet and the other one for bending it. This way we save resources both on material, because there is no waste, and on industrial treatments.
Furthermore, we built Akabei starting from a scrap of metal found as a reject in a mechanical workshop therefore we can say that it is 100% recycled from other processes’ waste.
Akabei is built to resist, it is nearly indestructible and it is perfectly safe: it can bear more than 200 kilograms without losing its shape so it is clearly not a single-use product at all.”

SOYC: “Why do you choose metal as your project’s material?”

Students: “We wanted to revalue metal as a material to sit on. We made it comfortable and relaxing by making it wave slightly when someone sit on it and light as it weighs just as the other wooden chairs in commerce. The metal plate bends a bit in the middle to adapt itself to the person who is sitting on and the absence of a backrest guarantees a correct posture. Moreover, the characteristic saddle form will cause no tingling if someone decides to sit for a long period.”

SOYC: “What did inspire you?”

Students: For the name, we took inspiration from Pacman’s ghost, as our stool’s form reminded us of its shape. Moreover, by looking at it from the front view, it seems invisible just like a ghost. For the shape and functionality, we took inspiration from the swings found at the park and from the work of Ron Arad.”


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Amplify your music with Filofono: Sustainable project For The Youth Design Day in Japan

Alessio Gentile is an Italian artisan who, working in the Restoration and Craftsmanship Association Laboratorio Ennio Gentile, had the idea of creating a 100% sustainable tool which can amplify the music reproduced by our smartphone. Its name is “Filofono” and below you can find the short interview we had with its creator.

SOYC: “Alessio, can you please talk about your project, explain us how does it work and focus on its sustainability?”

Alessio: “Filofono is an acoustic speaker for smartphones. There are no cables or wireless systems, the sound of music gets louder and warmer just because of the shape and the materials that we use: thin wood, water based colors, nails and glue. The production is completely handmade, it takes a week of work to complete one Filofono. The project is focused on sustainability for two main reasons: Filofono is a great choice to listen music in a domestic environment without buying a wireless/bluetooth speaker. That means, of course, energy saving. The second reason is the material: wood is a good alternative, especially when it comes from certified forests, if we want to reduce our plastic use for technology tools with low-life term.”

SOYC: “Where does the idea of Filofono take its origin?”

Alessio: “The idea was to build a beautiful object, with a vintage touch, meant to be useful and not only decorative. Only at the end of the creation we realized that Filofono had this natural feeling of a non-invasive design; a good, colored, sustainable alternative to the black bluetooth speakers that we see everyday. A natural amplifier that will never run out of energy. But also a nice item that invites everybody to play with it.”

SOYC: “Why did you decide to create that tool?”

Alessio: “Because I wanted to create a peculiar object, completely handmade, to represent the local craftsmanship and to celebrate the spirit of the people that are working there. I think that we need to start again to care about the importance of manual work and to understand how it can be useful to answer the urgency of finding new solutions for a sustainable design.”

SOYC: “What did inspire you and your idea of creating ‘Filofono’?”

Alessio: “Filofono is built following the shape of the old theatre speakers of the ’30’s. These models were huge, because they were meant to spread the sound of the first talking motion pictures. The horns were positioned behind the screen, so the effect must have been very impressing. We reduced the size and studied how to adapt the width of smartphones inside the speaker, keeping attention to balance the weight of the Filofono with a semi-circular foot. The shape reminds, also, the old gramophone bells, and that’s very close to the sound effect that generates.”


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