Archivi tag: Youth Design Day in Japan 2018

YDD projects in the Japanese market? Here what participants think!

Will the Youth Design Day in Japan projects be appreciated by the Japanese market? Surely, we hope so.

Watch the video below and find out what some of our participants answered to the question How can you see your project in the Japanese market?


Keep on following us on Facebook and find out the answers the other participants gave to the question!

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IED Turin students explain their Sustainable Mobility projects: Watch the video!

We asked the IED Turin students of the Transportation Design course to talk about their projects focusing on their sustainability element.

“What is your project and why it can be considered sustainable?” is the question, and below you can find their answers!


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Other ideas for #Sustainability in Japan? 2 new projects from IED Turin.

Last week, we presented the first three projects IED Turin selected from its Transportation Design course to partecipate to our contest The Youth Design Day in Japan. Now, let’s find out the other two participating projects!

The first of the two is that by Manuel Negri, 21 years old. It’s name is K-scrambler. Below some words from his author:

“K-scrambler is a zero-emission electric motorvehicle that has been conceived with the concept of sustainability in it. K-scrambler can be defined as a supporter of a particular innovation, in the social sphere, which foresees a change in the way of conceiving a motor vehicle, whose sole purpose is that of making fun, even in a hypothetical situation of city traffic. But it is in the dirt road and in the most remote places that its true captivating spirit is freed.

It is conceived when the problems of the planet become unsustainable, and one of these is the climate pollution caused by the emissions of diesel and petrol engines. It allows you to reach other unimaginable destinations to reach for such a segment and at the same time to preserve the surrounding environment.

It is developed to conceive it on a global level, and with the possibility of becoming part of a possible Japanese market, as it is linked to the concept of Keicar, a protagonist of the Japanese market between the 60s and 70s. The goal of this vehicle was to entertain the driver even in city traffic situations.”

Manuel Negri
Manuel Negri
k-scrambler
K-scrambler

 

The second of the two is by Tommaso Lorenzini, 22 years old.  (U) Pilen is the name of his project. Let’s find out what he told us about his work:

“My concept comes from the idea of saving materials and industrial assembly processes. Inspired by the meccano, the frame is made up of panels that can be laser cut, which are fixed with 3 load-bearing pins and join; battery, motor, mechanical components and hull. The customization of the vehicle already in series, relaunches a lot the value and the concept of uniqueness, despite, this product is born from a minimal industrial process which wants to reduce the use of material and the number of processing steps.

I projected a vehicle that is dynamic even in its internal parts, in facts, I created a frame that is adaptable to the needs of consumer with small variations in the canvas. These variations are very simple to make thanks to the industrial influence in the design approach. 

My vehicle id designed for young market, looking for an accessible entertainment. It is inspired by Meccano, a game of the past, with screws and bolts allowing to assemble various pieces of metal to create constructions. The pieces that formed these constructions were very light, and individually devoid of aesthetics.”

Tommaso Lorenzini
Tommaso Lorenzini
upilen
(U)Pilen

Keep on following us on Facebook and do not miss the video where the designers will tak about their concepts!

 

Communication Head of Superstudio Chiara Ferella Falda talks about Youth Design Day and Sustainability in Japan

A few days ago, we had the pleasure to interview Chiara Ferella Falda, Director of Communication and Special Projects Manager of Superstudio Group. Since many years, it has been presenting itself to the city of Milan as a great centre whose aim is to meet the needs of the city by representing an alternative to the Milan Fair and hosting art and fair exhibitions.  We asked her some questions about her point of view on the Sustainability theme in the Design field and below you can find the complete interview we had with her.

SUPERDESIGN SHOW @ Superstudio Più

SOYC: “At Superstudio you organize Superdesign Show, the great international event dedicated to furnishing and the latest design trends. Then, we wanted to know what you think about the link between Design and Japan. Do you think design is an element of inspiration in the Japanese market?”

Dr. Ferella Falda: I think that in Japan everything is Design in the true sense of the word. There is a maniacal attention to detail, form, functionality, aesthetics. Nature and tradition wisely blend with technology, rigor with a playful aspect, and poetry with irony…

The Japanese designers are expected and acclaimed during the Milan Design Week, the most important in the world. At the Superstudio, visitors also made three hours of queue to enter Nendo. And then Kengo Kuma: spectacular is his giant origami installation that absorbs pollution. And then the retrospective dedicated to the great Shiro Kuramata, or the transparent piano that played by itself by Kawai. They were the real attractions of our Superdesign Show 2018. But, next to the Japanese superstar, there were also less famous but very talented young people: Yoy (keep an eye on them, we’ll hear a lot about them…), Budbrand, Yokohama Makers Village, Japan Design Week…

Nendo
Dassault, Kengo Kuma

On the one hand, I believe that Japan has acquired a new awareness of its importance and influence on the international market, on the other it has become increasingly able to exploit “Design” as means of communication and not only as a result of a process. The success of the mega installations of technology companies such as Panasonic, Citizen, Toshiba, Sony, Lexus and Fuorisalone demonstrate how design has increasingly become a powerful communication tool, even for consumers, beyond the commercial product to be sold.

SOYC: “What is your opinion about “Design and Planet – Sustainability Projections”, theme of our contest The Youth Design Day in Japan, which aim is to combine design and attention to the sustainability needs of the planet?”

Dr. Ferella Falda: I think it’s a great opportunity of exchange between Asia and Europe, and a special showcase for young Italian talents. I really appreciate how the theme of sustainability has been approached by the contest. The word “green” became almost an empty concept a few years ago: everything was eco, everything was sustainable, everything was cruelty free, but often this attention reflected only a new trend… It is a little like it happens today with the “vegan” phenomenon. The time to tackle the topic urgently and rigorously has come: there is no more time for us and the planet.

Your call goes in this direction. It mentions in detail low energy and water use, saving of harmful emissions, eco-sustainable housing and architectural solutions, innovative urban furniture, recycling and use of waste, bio-based materials, clean and renewable energy, biodegradable packaging, etc. A very serious and articulated approach.

SOYC: “According to you, what is the direction design will take in relation to the Sustainability element?

Dr. Ferella Falda: We are already witnessing the banning of certain materials such as plastic. Before we recycled it, now in many areas it will be forbidden to produce it and use it. I believe that the gravity of the situation involves forced radical choices. It is a world emergency. Design will have to accept the challenge and propose more and more radical solutions that are also aesthetically pleasing and functional, at acceptable costs. Nanotechnologies are certainly one of the most interesting solutions to obtain new materials capable of purifying the air and I was also very impressed by the study of bacteria able to “digest” the polluting substances… The time for half-measures is over, now we have to really act.

SOYC: Is it possible that in the future there will be meeting points and synergies between Superstudio and Switch On Your Creativity?

Dr. Ferella Falda: “Superstudio has always followed new paths not beaten by others. It has been the pioneer of the Fuorisalone phenomenon since 2000. Even earlier, in the 80s, his engine has transformed a peripheral industrial area in today’s famous Tortona area. Asia (Japan in particular, but also Korea, China, Taiwan and Thailand) has always loved Superstudio. Every year we have many requests from companies or designers who want to present their projects here at Superdesign, because they know they can find an iconic place that enhances them and communicates them with professionalism worldwide.

Every new challenge, every creative project that is also innovative, research based, and that values ​​new talents, stimulates us a lot. Therefore, it definitely exists a point of encounter and mutual interest with “Switch on Your Creativity.


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“Innovation Hub” and “WoodBike”: two examples of Sustainability you will see in Osaka for the YDD 2018.

Alastair Brook, Jack Lehane, Jason Ladrigan and Seán Conlan-Smith are four design doctoral students which decided to found the DSGN Movement (Design Student Global Network), a new project pioneered by an international network of student designers and social communities. Read the interview to find out what their project is about!

DSGN: “Our first major project is located in Pejarakan, a village in the northwestern region of Bali– nestled between mountains and the sea. Despite this, the inhabitants are often from struggling families and live on the poverty line. To combat this, we have partnered with a local community development organisation and are building a self-sustaining Innovation Hub to educate Balinese youth on environmental and economic security.”

SOYC: “The project you are going to create, the Innovation Hub, it’s your property. But what about the designers and authors of the project?”

DSGN: “This Innovation Hub has been designed by Hanna Haczek and Ewelina Andrecka, two Polish Architecture Students who won our recent architecture competition!”

Hanna and Ewelina
Ewelina Andrecka and Hanna Haczek 

SOYC: “Can you told us what they said you about their project?”

DSGN: “Yes, of course. Here their words: The hub is designed in such a way that it gives the impression of a perfect balance with the surrounding nature. It is divided into three sections by mobile walls – frames filled with bamboo, a sustainable material – that are arranged to the users preference. the heart of the facility there is an installation which cools down the inside by using stored rainwater and natural airflow circulation- saving on unneeded power. Simplicity is key here- and usage of local building materials and plain environmental solutions play a significant role in achieving harmony with the environment.

SOYC: “What did inspire you to produce such an important project and make it reality?”

DSGN: “Our first project in Bali began when we met the Five Pillar Foundation. Its leaders, I Putu Wiraguna and Alan Yu, have a dream of creating a sustainable and self-sufficient Innovation Hub, where the local community can teach each other craft and design skills and boost their local economy.

This Innovation Hub will overcome a shortage of education and knowledge in the local community. A lack of social collaboration has meant there are many jobless people. The future development of Bali will come through re-connecting with our local culture and our environment. The project connects students of architecture and design from around the world with local youth, allowing freedom of design thinking that will spark new and exciting entrepreneurial opportunities – creating a sustainable community in the heart of the island.”


The other project we are going to present today is that by Clementina Chiarini and Nicolò Cellina. They designed a craft-made bike which is made of wood and perfectly fits with your body and your preferences.

SOYC: “So, can you please talk about your project, which is close to the green mobility cause?”

Clementina: “A wood bike is what you need to move around the city: no traffic, no pollution and no sedentary people! It is a special bike because it is craft made. It is a prototype based in a digital model that you can customize according to your body and your tastes. The bike fits you and you fit your bike. This design object is useful and it is the symbol of green mobility with zero emission. Moreover, it is made of a renewable material: wood. In particular, it is a wasted wood in very good condition that we recycle and combine to make a beautiful bike.”

SOYC: “Where does your project take its origins?”

Nicolò: “Everything begins whit a question: How can we recycle wasted wood with small dimensions from carpentry? Of course, making a bike! Promote a green way of life also when we move it is very important for us and for our planet. Using multilayered wood, it is the answer. This technique allows to recycle small pieces and different types of wood. For the shape, the main source of inspiration for the project is the shape of the bikes used in the early nineties. The study of the shape and the geometry of one of those frames have been taken as a base configuration to develop the shape of our frame.”


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Akabei: a sustainable metal-made stool for The Youth Design Day in Japan

Emanuele Matteucci, Giovanni Silvestri and Michele Tunzi are three Design of the Industrial Product students in Bologna, Italy. They created Akabei, a metal stool starting from one single scrap of metal found as a reject in a mechanical workshop. This is where the sustainability of their project stands. Here the short interview we had with them!

SOYC: “Can you talk us about your design project and its sustainability?”

Students: “Our stool, Akabei, is truly sustainable for many aspects. It is made from a single rectangular sheet of inox steel of only 2 millimetres in thickness. We need only two machineries to produce it: one for cutting the sheet and the other one for bending it. This way we save resources both on material, because there is no waste, and on industrial treatments.
Furthermore, we built Akabei starting from a scrap of metal found as a reject in a mechanical workshop therefore we can say that it is 100% recycled from other processes’ waste.
Akabei is built to resist, it is nearly indestructible and it is perfectly safe: it can bear more than 200 kilograms without losing its shape so it is clearly not a single-use product at all.”

SOYC: “Why do you choose metal as your project’s material?”

Students: “We wanted to revalue metal as a material to sit on. We made it comfortable and relaxing by making it wave slightly when someone sit on it and light as it weighs just as the other wooden chairs in commerce. The metal plate bends a bit in the middle to adapt itself to the person who is sitting on and the absence of a backrest guarantees a correct posture. Moreover, the characteristic saddle form will cause no tingling if someone decides to sit for a long period.”

SOYC: “What did inspire you?”

Students: For the name, we took inspiration from Pacman’s ghost, as our stool’s form reminded us of its shape. Moreover, by looking at it from the front view, it seems invisible just like a ghost. For the shape and functionality, we took inspiration from the swings found at the park and from the work of Ron Arad.”


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Assessor Cristina Tajani on SOYC 5th edition

Within the 5th edition of Switch On Your Creativity, we are pleased to inform you that the project is sponsored, again this year, by the Municipality of Milan.

Cristina Tajani, City of Milan assesor of Labour Policies, speaks about Switch On Your Creativity and The Youth Design Day in Japan.

Switch On Your Creativity was born as an Asian Studies Group production in 2013 and was presented as an intercultural and international contest. It promotes the creativity of young artists following The Charter of Values For Youth Creativity guidelines, born during the contest’s second edition.

The contest has become in its third edition an accelerator of creative projects with the aim of supporting the creation, the promotion and the realizations of artistic contents by Europe and Asia.

This year edition’s theme is Design and Planet and will see the participation of Design projects selected by Asian Studies Group within The Youth Design Day in the Italia Amore Mio Festival, which is the biggest Italian Festival in Japan.