Archivi tag: Sustainable Mobility

IED Turin students explain their Sustainable Mobility projects: Watch the video!

We asked the IED Turin students of the Transportation Design course to talk about their projects focusing on their sustainability element.

“What is your project and why it can be considered sustainable?” is the question, and below you can find their answers!


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Other ideas for #Sustainability in Japan? 2 new projects from IED Turin.

Last week, we presented the first three projects IED Turin selected from its Transportation Design course to partecipate to our contest The Youth Design Day in Japan. Now, let’s find out the other two participating projects!

The first of the two is that by Manuel Negri, 21 years old. It’s name is K-scrambler. Below some words from his author:

“K-scrambler is a zero-emission electric motorvehicle that has been conceived with the concept of sustainability in it. K-scrambler can be defined as a supporter of a particular innovation, in the social sphere, which foresees a change in the way of conceiving a motor vehicle, whose sole purpose is that of making fun, even in a hypothetical situation of city traffic. But it is in the dirt road and in the most remote places that its true captivating spirit is freed.

It is conceived when the problems of the planet become unsustainable, and one of these is the climate pollution caused by the emissions of diesel and petrol engines. It allows you to reach other unimaginable destinations to reach for such a segment and at the same time to preserve the surrounding environment.

It is developed to conceive it on a global level, and with the possibility of becoming part of a possible Japanese market, as it is linked to the concept of Keicar, a protagonist of the Japanese market between the 60s and 70s. The goal of this vehicle was to entertain the driver even in city traffic situations.”

Manuel Negri
Manuel Negri
k-scrambler
K-scrambler

 

The second of the two is by Tommaso Lorenzini, 22 years old.  (U) Pilen is the name of his project. Let’s find out what he told us about his work:

“My concept comes from the idea of saving materials and industrial assembly processes. Inspired by the meccano, the frame is made up of panels that can be laser cut, which are fixed with 3 load-bearing pins and join; battery, motor, mechanical components and hull. The customization of the vehicle already in series, relaunches a lot the value and the concept of uniqueness, despite, this product is born from a minimal industrial process which wants to reduce the use of material and the number of processing steps.

I projected a vehicle that is dynamic even in its internal parts, in facts, I created a frame that is adaptable to the needs of consumer with small variations in the canvas. These variations are very simple to make thanks to the industrial influence in the design approach. 

My vehicle id designed for young market, looking for an accessible entertainment. It is inspired by Meccano, a game of the past, with screws and bolts allowing to assemble various pieces of metal to create constructions. The pieces that formed these constructions were very light, and individually devoid of aesthetics.”

Tommaso Lorenzini
Tommaso Lorenzini
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Keep on following us on Facebook and do not miss the video where the designers will tak about their concepts!

 

Curious about the IED Turin proposals for #YDD? Here are 3 projects by its students!

As anticipated by an article published last week, IED Turin selected some of its students of the Transportation Design course, to participate to our contest The Youth Design Day in Japan, also due to the fact that the deep attention to Sustainability is a common element that join Switch On Your Creativity and the University in Turin. The projects they selected are 5, and in this article you are going to find out 3 of them. The other projects will be illustrated in the next one.  Let’s start from the first project.

It is by Emanuele Tomassorri, 21 years old. It regards Honda Motorinoa vehicle prototype which tries to combine functionality and portability without overlooking the importance of Sustainability.

Here what its creator says about his project:

“Honda motorino was born from a modern interpretation of the vehicle from which it takes its inspiration, the Motocombo. Its purpose is to mix urban life together with the mobility of urban planning itself, an object that allows you to be guided or transported easily, depending on the user’s needs.

This project was born to overcome the problems of space, use and theft caused by vehicles in this segment, being an object that is easily transportable and very intuitive in its use.

It tries to avoid dead spots during the use of the vehicle in areas where the vehicle in motion cannot be used. Simply, it bends and is totally transportable on the shoulder.”

emanuele tomassorri
Emanuele Tomassorri

 

hondamotorino
Honda Motorino

 

The second project is by Matteo Prola21 years old. His project name is F111 and concerns a prototype of a completely electric vehicle for the Ferrari brand.

Below the words from Matteo about his work:

F 111 is a zero-emission electric vehicle with a rooted sense of sustainability in his concept. What characterizes it is the sinuosity of the shapes, as if a veil were dropped and then molded to the underlying structure, thus creating and transmitting that sense of lightness and elegance, without forgetting to give back the right dynamism to the volume. 

[…] It is conceived to respond to the needs that will born when car sharing will be very popular and people, tired of them, will want to return to the pleasure of driving. Especially when the problems of the planet become unsustainable due to the emissions of petrol and diesel engines. This is why it has the key to sustainability in terms of solving a social problem caused by these dynamics. This product will allow people to have very high performance at the level of a 12 cylinder, but at the same time able to preserve the surrounding environment.

[…]This project has been developed and conceived with an eye always towards the internationalization of the product. Japan has always been a lover of the reds of Maranello, since the 70s, when the feeling broke out. The attraction for the elegant and muscular forms, and the innovation that Ferrari has always included in its models. I was inspired by the F40 because at that time it had stunned the audience, as if it came from another planet. Result obtained thanks to the collaboration with Pininfarina. The goal was to create a sort of Formula 1 adapted to road use.”

matteoprola
Matteo Prola
F111
F111

 

The third project is by Mirko Pocobello, 25 years old. The name of his project is Pathos and it is a motorbike model made for Maserati. It involves elegant lines and sustainable life-circle.

Here what Mirko has explained us:

“Pathos is a motorbike made for the Maserati brand. It is a visionary product that does not have a precise temporal collocation. Hence the idea of ​​thinking of an object that could be out of time, that did not undergo fashions or trends of the moment. A primordial object, the achievement of a further synthesis, both volumetric and conceptual. Thus, drawing a sustainable product because of an end of life that potentially does not exist, an avatar that lives with us as long as we are alive, an extension of the body. This is Pathos.

[…]I believe that the search for a new formal language does not have to consider market segments as hermetic zones from which one cannot go out. Rather, I believe that the contagion between the various areas of design is of vital importance for the continuous evolution.”

mirkopocobello
Mirko Pocobello
pathos
Pathos

Follow us on Facebook if you want not to miss the other Youth Design Day projects by IED Turin students!

 

 

SWITCH ON YOUR CREATIVITY PRESENTS IED TURIN STUDENTS FOR THE YOUTH DESIGN DAY IN JAPAN

IED Turin, that was the only Design Academy which took part to Fuori Salone with some of its students, decided to reply to our call for The Youth Design Day in Japan. IED Turin proposed to us some of its Transportation Design students to participate to our contest.

As illustrated on the IED Turin webpage about Transportation Design class, the aim of the course is that to form Transportation Designers: “The Transportation Designer is able to reconcile aspects of style, technique, aerodynamics, production feasibility and ergonomics. This kind of designer must have a profound understanding of the product and the functions that the consumer is looking for, so as to be able to have a clear idea about the relationship between design and marketing, innovation and commercial requirements along with the social trend and the economic background in which he is operating.”

We selected five students with this profile and soon we are presenting their projects, that will be then exhibited by November at the Italian Cultural Institute in Osaka, Japan. The five students are:

  • Emanuele Tommassorri
  • Manuel Negri
  • Matteo Prola
  • Mirko Pocobello
  • Tommaso Lorenzini

Their projects concern Sustainable Mobility and are conceived for important brands like Ferrari, Honda and Maserati between the others. Moreover, the projects they propose are bike-projects, which is an innovative aspect for these car traditional brands.


Stay tuned and find out the projects by IED Turin Transportation Designers! Follow us on Facebook!

“Innovation Hub” and “WoodBike”: two examples of Sustainability you will see in Osaka for the YDD 2018.

Alastair Brook, Jack Lehane, Jason Ladrigan and Seán Conlan-Smith are four design doctoral students which decided to found the DSGN Movement (Design Student Global Network), a new project pioneered by an international network of student designers and social communities. Read the interview to find out what their project is about!

DSGN: “Our first major project is located in Pejarakan, a village in the northwestern region of Bali– nestled between mountains and the sea. Despite this, the inhabitants are often from struggling families and live on the poverty line. To combat this, we have partnered with a local community development organisation and are building a self-sustaining Innovation Hub to educate Balinese youth on environmental and economic security.”

SOYC: “The project you are going to create, the Innovation Hub, it’s your property. But what about the designers and authors of the project?”

DSGN: “This Innovation Hub has been designed by Hanna Haczek and Ewelina Andrecka, two Polish Architecture Students who won our recent architecture competition!”

Hanna and Ewelina
Ewelina Andrecka and Hanna Haczek 

SOYC: “Can you told us what they said you about their project?”

DSGN: “Yes, of course. Here their words: The hub is designed in such a way that it gives the impression of a perfect balance with the surrounding nature. It is divided into three sections by mobile walls – frames filled with bamboo, a sustainable material – that are arranged to the users preference. the heart of the facility there is an installation which cools down the inside by using stored rainwater and natural airflow circulation- saving on unneeded power. Simplicity is key here- and usage of local building materials and plain environmental solutions play a significant role in achieving harmony with the environment.

SOYC: “What did inspire you to produce such an important project and make it reality?”

DSGN: “Our first project in Bali began when we met the Five Pillar Foundation. Its leaders, I Putu Wiraguna and Alan Yu, have a dream of creating a sustainable and self-sufficient Innovation Hub, where the local community can teach each other craft and design skills and boost their local economy.

This Innovation Hub will overcome a shortage of education and knowledge in the local community. A lack of social collaboration has meant there are many jobless people. The future development of Bali will come through re-connecting with our local culture and our environment. The project connects students of architecture and design from around the world with local youth, allowing freedom of design thinking that will spark new and exciting entrepreneurial opportunities – creating a sustainable community in the heart of the island.”


The other project we are going to present today is that by Clementina Chiarini and Nicolò Cellina. They designed a craft-made bike which is made of wood and perfectly fits with your body and your preferences.

SOYC: “So, can you please talk about your project, which is close to the green mobility cause?”

Clementina: “A wood bike is what you need to move around the city: no traffic, no pollution and no sedentary people! It is a special bike because it is craft made. It is a prototype based in a digital model that you can customize according to your body and your tastes. The bike fits you and you fit your bike. This design object is useful and it is the symbol of green mobility with zero emission. Moreover, it is made of a renewable material: wood. In particular, it is a wasted wood in very good condition that we recycle and combine to make a beautiful bike.”

SOYC: “Where does your project take its origins?”

Nicolò: “Everything begins whit a question: How can we recycle wasted wood with small dimensions from carpentry? Of course, making a bike! Promote a green way of life also when we move it is very important for us and for our planet. Using multilayered wood, it is the answer. This technique allows to recycle small pieces and different types of wood. For the shape, the main source of inspiration for the project is the shape of the bikes used in the early nineties. The study of the shape and the geometry of one of those frames have been taken as a base configuration to develop the shape of our frame.”


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SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY: A KEY POINT CONNECTING MILAN TO OSAKA YDD 2018

Sustainable mobility is the mobility model that enables movement with minimal environmental and territorial impact.

Nowadays there are very different kind of transport vehicles we can choose between to move around the city. We can go to school, to office or wherever we want to go by car, bus, underground, motorcycle, taxi and so on.

All these kinds of vehicles contribute to pollution level’s growth.

Mexico City

The challenges associated with growing traffic, especially in cities, are significant and threaten to become insurmountable. And despite the wide range of ways to get around, there have never been so many people who lack access to transportation or the means to use transportation.

Yet another impact was an increase in sedentary lifestyles, causing and complicating a national epidemic of obesity, and accompanying dramatically increased health care costs.

As the interest and the sensitivity towards pollution problems and sustainability are increasing among society, much are the less polluting solutions that were born (car and bike sharing to mention some).

Sustainable mobility is the purpose which guides Clementina Chiarini and Nicolò Cellina in the project they presented us for The Youth Design Day 2018 edition.

Clementina Chiarini and Nicolò Cellina

Clementina and Nicolò are 24 and 25 years old and are two Italian Architecture students.

The two young students are very glad for the opportunity that we gave them to bring their project in a country which has always considered the theme of sustainable mobility as something truly necessary for the planet’s need to reduce pollution.

In fact, Japan was one of the first countries to internationally highlight the importance of adopting more eco-sustainable behaviors.

Here what they say about their Sustainable Mobility project:

A […] is what you need to move around the city: no traffic, no pollution and no sedentary people! It is special because it is craft made. It is a prototype based in a digital model that you can customize according to your body and your tastes.


Continue to follow us to discover how Clementina and Nicolò developed their idea of Sustainable Mobility to make it more accessible!