Archivi tag: Sustainability

Refillable bottle made sustainable by the use of Bamboo: A green project participating to YDD 2018 edition.

Daniel Skoták and Patrik Rešl are two Czech design students who created a refillable bottle made of bamboo which we can always be brought with us. Here the interview we had with them and what they explained us about their project.

SOYC: “Guys, can you please talk about your project and its sustainability?”

Daniel: “Our project is a refillable drinks bottle made of bamboo, designed for portability and reusability. We have chosen bamboo as our material as it is renewable, sustainable, and carbon neutral. However, the nature of the material is that it will eventually become warped by the presence of the liquid inside. In order to combat this, our design features a two-part outer layer, made of stainless steel, that is kept by the owner. This outer layer is fitted on top of the bamboo inner layer, which is affordably replaceable.”

SOYC: Where does the idea of your bottle take its origin?”

Patrik: The project was born of a conversation between two team members, regarding the unsustainable modern world. Disposable products are increasingly made of plastic and other unsustainable hydrocarbon based materials, which play a large part in polluting our oceans. Plastic as a material is not degradable, which results in plastic microbes entering the ecology of our oceans. This affects marine life, which eventually impacts people.”

SOYC: Why did you decide to use bamboo to create your bottle?”

Daniel: Bamboo was chosen as the material because it is fast-growing, which lessens the negative impact on its environment. It is also carbon-neutral, because it absorbs carbon dioxide while it grows. We want to support and join the ever-growing movement of sustainable design, as this is an element of products that consumers are increasingly looking for.”

SOYC: “Ok thank you guys. One last question: What did inspire your idea?”

Patrik: “This project was inspired by the use of bamboo as a traditional construction material in Japanese and other East Asian cultures. We were inspired by wanting to have a positive impact on the planet.”


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Cardboard-made lounge chair: a 100% sustainable and recycled project from Milan to Osaka Youth Design Day

Alessandro Azzolini is a young Italian Architectural Design student at Politecnico di Milano. He designed a lounge chair which is completely made of recycled cardboards.

Here the interview we had with him!

SOYC: “Alessandro, can you talk about your project and its sustainability dimension?”

Alessandro: “My project consists of a lounge chair completely made of regenerated corrugated cardboard sheets that are laser-cut and assembled together with interlocking joints. Carboard is a very eco-sustainable material since it comes from renewable sources and can be recycled. The interlocking joints make the structure stable and allow to completely avoid the use of glue in a way to keep the 100% recyclabilityIt can be assembled in a quick way directly by the final user and it can be easily disassembled and stored flat in a way that occupies the least amount of space.”

SOYC: Why did you decide to design your chair?”

Alessandro: Because it is very economical since it uses waste material that can be obtained for free and because overall the chair has a very low environmental impact.
The choice of material and the easiness of (dis)assembly make this product perfect as a temporary furniture. When the chair’s lifecycle has ended, either because it has been damaged or the user wants to change it (since the contemporary world is very fast in consumption), the cardboard can just be thrown into the paper trash bin without problems and without worrying about the impact on our planet resources (since the reused cardboard of the chair would in any case have headed to the paper waste).”

SOYC: What did inspire your design concept?

Alessandro: “The design takes inspiration on one side from the shape of those ergonomic plastic seating that are meant to maximise comfort and on the other side from the metal grid-structure chairs, which I was sceptical about but after testing them in my life I realised they were comfortable indeed. The seating shape is lofted to form a circle, that in the base forms an elliptical footprint.
The chair components can be made out of 16 sheets of cardboard measuring 1x2m or either from 34 sheets of 1×1,2m. The dimension of sheets used is flexible and the number of sheets depends on it.”


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Akabei: a sustainable metal-made stool for The Youth Design Day in Japan

Emanuele Matteucci, Giovanni Silvestri and Michele Tunzi are three Design of the Industrial Product students in Bologna, Italy. They created Akabei, a metal stool starting from one single scrap of metal found as a reject in a mechanical workshop. This is where the sustainability of their project stands. Here the short interview we had with them!

SOYC: “Can you talk us about your design project and its sustainability?”

Students: “Our stool, Akabei, is truly sustainable for many aspects. It is made from a single rectangular sheet of inox steel of only 2 millimetres in thickness. We need only two machineries to produce it: one for cutting the sheet and the other one for bending it. This way we save resources both on material, because there is no waste, and on industrial treatments.
Furthermore, we built Akabei starting from a scrap of metal found as a reject in a mechanical workshop therefore we can say that it is 100% recycled from other processes’ waste.
Akabei is built to resist, it is nearly indestructible and it is perfectly safe: it can bear more than 200 kilograms without losing its shape so it is clearly not a single-use product at all.”

SOYC: “Why do you choose metal as your project’s material?”

Students: “We wanted to revalue metal as a material to sit on. We made it comfortable and relaxing by making it wave slightly when someone sit on it and light as it weighs just as the other wooden chairs in commerce. The metal plate bends a bit in the middle to adapt itself to the person who is sitting on and the absence of a backrest guarantees a correct posture. Moreover, the characteristic saddle form will cause no tingling if someone decides to sit for a long period.”

SOYC: “What did inspire you?”

Students: For the name, we took inspiration from Pacman’s ghost, as our stool’s form reminded us of its shape. Moreover, by looking at it from the front view, it seems invisible just like a ghost. For the shape and functionality, we took inspiration from the swings found at the park and from the work of Ron Arad.”


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Amplify your music with Filofono: Sustainable project For The Youth Design Day in Japan

Alessio Gentile is an Italian artisan who, working in the Restoration and Craftsmanship Association Laboratorio Ennio Gentile, had the idea of creating a 100% sustainable tool which can amplify the music reproduced by our smartphone. Its name is “Filofono” and below you can find the short interview we had with its creator.

SOYC: “Alessio, can you please talk about your project, explain us how does it work and focus on its sustainability?”

Alessio: “Filofono is an acoustic speaker for smartphones. There are no cables or wireless systems, the sound of music gets louder and warmer just because of the shape and the materials that we use: thin wood, water based colors, nails and glue. The production is completely handmade, it takes a week of work to complete one Filofono. The project is focused on sustainability for two main reasons: Filofono is a great choice to listen music in a domestic environment without buying a wireless/bluetooth speaker. That means, of course, energy saving. The second reason is the material: wood is a good alternative, especially when it comes from certified forests, if we want to reduce our plastic use for technology tools with low-life term.”

SOYC: “Where does the idea of Filofono take its origin?”

Alessio: “The idea was to build a beautiful object, with a vintage touch, meant to be useful and not only decorative. Only at the end of the creation we realized that Filofono had this natural feeling of a non-invasive design; a good, colored, sustainable alternative to the black bluetooth speakers that we see everyday. A natural amplifier that will never run out of energy. But also a nice item that invites everybody to play with it.”

SOYC: “Why did you decide to create that tool?”

Alessio: “Because I wanted to create a peculiar object, completely handmade, to represent the local craftsmanship and to celebrate the spirit of the people that are working there. I think that we need to start again to care about the importance of manual work and to understand how it can be useful to answer the urgency of finding new solutions for a sustainable design.”

SOYC: “What did inspire you and your idea of creating ‘Filofono’?”

Alessio: “Filofono is built following the shape of the old theatre speakers of the ’30’s. These models were huge, because they were meant to spread the sound of the first talking motion pictures. The horns were positioned behind the screen, so the effect must have been very impressing. We reduced the size and studied how to adapt the width of smartphones inside the speaker, keeping attention to balance the weight of the Filofono with a semi-circular foot. The shape reminds, also, the old gramophone bells, and that’s very close to the sound effect that generates.”


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Food Design: The Italian Food Heritage made sustainable for The Youth Design Day in Osaka

Let’s go on presenting the design projects which were selected to participate to The Youth Design Day in Japan 2018 and talk about the project by Vincenzo Sorrentino, an Italian designer who deals with concept concerning food. This kind of concept is called Food Design. What is it?

Food design is a recent term that encompasses the process of design studies and research leading to the emergence of new products related to food. This discipline is due to industrial design and deals with the design of food, parts of food products and products related to them in some way.

The Food Design project meets and mixes various disciplines such as biology, genetics, anthropology, psychoanalysis, food sociology, social research and social mediation, not least the history of kitchen systems and of forms of conviviality.

Below a short interview we had with Vincenzo, who we asked to speak about his design.

SOYC: “Hi Vincenzo! Can you explain us what your design project is about and how it is sustainable?”

Vincenzo: “Hi! So… I called my project ‘Next Pot’ and it is a set of experiential tableware made of clay, the production is based in an artisanal craft workshop and we developed the production of the collection by mixing different techniques that allowed us to recycle the clay during the production. Moreover, we based our model on demand production in order to be more efficient. Every product that we realized introduce new eating rituals.

SOYC: “And why did you decide to create your ‘Next Pot’?”

Vincenzo: “I decided to work with the food of my native place (Naples) and I re-create the eating experience of some iconic recipes such as ‘Caprese salad’ using new tools and plates that are made in collaboration with an artisanal ceramic workshop. My first goal was to promote the culinary heritage and local products with Food Design and another goal was to collaborate and empower traditional artisans with a new design and sustainable production.”

SOYC: “Where did you find the inspiration to create that design?”

Vincenzo: “I got inspired by observing the eating gesture of every day and after several reflections and tests on people around I developed new rituals and object. For example, the eating jewels were inspired by the facts that in Naples years ago people were used to eat with hands and so I recreated that gesture and designed something that was making that possible but without any contamination of food with hands.”

SOYC: “Vincenzo, we thank you a lot for explaining us your concept and we are sure the people who will visit the exhibition in Osaka will really enjoy your ‘Next Pot’!


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BAMBOO: SUSTAINABLE MATERIAL FROM THE YOUTH DESIGN DAY IN JAPAN 2018

Technically a grass, bamboo has been used in decorations and many other assortments, but has only recently been used on a large scale for very different uses. Perhaps thanks to the sustainable movement, the material has become increasingly popular.

The benefits of bamboo are many fold. This material is a very fast growing, renewable and easy-to-grow resource. It is an extremely versatile material with countless uses including construction, clothes, food and fuel. Moreover, bamboo has anti-bacterial properties and is water resistant that makes it a great building material.

There are over 1000 species of bamboo. This amazing plant grows in tropical and temperate environments and is very hardy, not needing pesticides or herbicides to grow well. It is a type of grass and grows from its roots, when it is cut it quickly grows back with most species maturing in 3-5 years.

Some facts about the sustainability of bamboo are:

  • It is grown without pesticides or chemical fertilisers
  • It grows rapidly and can be harvested in 3-5 years
  • It produces 35% more oxygen that an equivalent stand of trees
  • It is a critical element in the balance of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere
  • It is an excellent soil erosion inhibitor
  • It grows in a wide range of environments
  • It’s production into fibres has lower environmental impact than other forms of fibre, especially synthetic ones.

Two are the projects which were inspired by the great sustainability features of bamboo and that will be presented in Japan during The Youth Design Day 2018 edition.

Both the two projects were selected because of their purpose, which has always been dear to Japan and its culture: using sustainable material to create something useful to people and to planet.

One of these projects is by two young Czech Design students:

Daniel Skoták and Patrik Rešl

Daniel Skoták
Patrik Rešl

Daniel is 21 years old, while Patrik is 26. These two guys project uses bamboo as the main material of an object which takes up a very important space in our daily lives.

Here what they told us while talking about their project:

Bamboo was chosen as the material because it is fast-growing, which lessens the negative impact on its environment. It is also carbon-neutral, because it absorbs carbon dioxide while it grows. We want to support and join the ever-growing movement of sustainable design, as this is an element of products that consumers are increasingly looking for.

 

The other project is by a group of Irish and English designers:

Jack Lehane, Jason Ladrigan, Seán Conlan-Smith and Alastair Brook

From left to right: Jack Lehane, Jason Ladrigan, Seán Conlan-Smith and Alastair Brook

They are 24, 24, 26 and 26 and the founders of the DSGN movement, which is a new project pioneered by an international network of student designers. Alongside their sister organisation, MEDS Meeting of Design Students, they have brought creative students from across 45+ international countries together, labouring with love on architecture, design, art, film, photography, and media projects at their annual workshops.

The design which won the competition and which DSGN are implementing and constructing in Bali is by two Polish Architecture Students:

Ewelina Andrecka and Hanna Haczek

Left: Ewelina Andrecka, right: Hanna Haczek

This is what they said about their projects:

The […] is designed in such a way that it gives the impression of a perfect balance with the surrounding nature. It is divided into three sections by mobile walls- frames filled with bamboo, a sustainable material. […] Simplicity is key here and usage of local building materials and plain environmental solutions play a significant role in achieving harmony with the environment.


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Assessor Cristina Tajani on SOYC 5th edition

Within the 5th edition of Switch On Your Creativity, we are pleased to inform you that the project is sponsored, again this year, by the Municipality of Milan.

Cristina Tajani, City of Milan assesor of Labour Policies, speaks about Switch On Your Creativity and The Youth Design Day in Japan.

Switch On Your Creativity was born as an Asian Studies Group production in 2013 and was presented as an intercultural and international contest. It promotes the creativity of young artists following The Charter of Values For Youth Creativity guidelines, born during the contest’s second edition.

The contest has become in its third edition an accelerator of creative projects with the aim of supporting the creation, the promotion and the realizations of artistic contents by Europe and Asia.

This year edition’s theme is Design and Planet and will see the participation of Design projects selected by Asian Studies Group within The Youth Design Day in the Italia Amore Mio Festival, which is the biggest Italian Festival in Japan.